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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
in dealing with the taliban. yet the taliban is claiming responsibility for the assassination, which has opened a power vacuum in the country. this is our report. >> ahmad wali karzai live behind layers of security. he had many enemies. today, his enemy was his end. assassins struck here at his home. a trusted assassin, a bodyguard. another bodyguard shot of a killer dead. it was too late, ahmad wali karzai died almost immediately and the news traveled fast. in kabul, president karzai announced his death. >> this morning, he said, my younger brother was murdered -- martyred in his house. this is the life of the afghan people. we have all suffered from the same pain. ahmad wali karzai was the most powerful player in kandahar. when we recently visited his compound, it was probably a day like today. he was the man to solve every problem. that created problems for him. >> this is for the big attacks, like suicide attacks. are two major suicide attacks on me -- on my office -- there were two major suicide attacks me -oe -- on my office. >> are they still happening? >> taliban pou >> he came u
was shot and killed in his kandahar home today. a killer a bodyguard who taliban officials say they hired to infiltrate karzai's inner circle. this comes as a blow to the government just days after a visit from u.s. defense secretary leon panetta. we're joined by william cohen. thank you for being with us. >> good to be with you. >> let me ask you about this assassination. some have said this will be a huge propaganda victory for the taliban. do youee? >> anytime they can get that close to the inner circle of president karzai it's a big victory for them. it points out the difficulty that president karzai has had in trying to cope with the local politics as such where all frequently invoking tip o'neill's axiom that all politics is local. we're seeing that all politics are local in afghanistan. that's one of the problems that president karzai has. secondly his brother has a reputation of being a power broker. most of our military leaders have said there's not a military solution in afghanistan it's a political one. it makes it that much more difficult. i think it's going to be more challen
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
with a friend with a k-47. he was a key power broker in the fight with the taliban. we're live from kabul. it's tuesday, july 12th. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. we start with the deadlock. this afternoon the two sides are farther apart than they've ever been. they were farther apart yesterday when -- then they were even sunday and farther apart sunday then they were thursday. the question is whether the daily meetings are going to continue. the president said he's shooting for the biggest possible deal and asking if not now, when. listen. >> we think it's hard now. imagine how these guys are going to be thinking six months from now in the middle of election season when they are all up. it's not going to get easier, it's going to get harder. we might as well do it now. pull off the band-aid. eat our peas. >> also in the room, eric cantor laid out what was agreed to in the biden talks, which is about $1.5 trillion in cuts, still nearly a trillion dollars short of the amount required to finance a debt deal through 2012. republicans said it needs to be dollar for dollar. the
a special personal interest in defeating the taliban. and afghanistan as a whole had seen how evil the taliban was. how much damage they could do to society as they burned paintings and books and films and totally suppressed freedom in afghanistan. they knew. these people were evil but they were afraid of them but with the united states weaponry, with our guidance and intelligence training these people defeated the taliban. what i was not aware of until we met with these folks and turns out i could have been aware, i just was not, but do you the research, you find out, the bush administration convinced the northern alliance, ok, now that you've whipped the taliban you need to totally disarm. because we're the united states and we're here and we'll make sure nothing happens to you again. well, the northern alliance messed up because they trusted us and they turned in their weapons, i asked one, you turned in all your weapons? well, apparently they have some small arms, but nothing that would allow them to take on the taliban again. naturally these people were concerned because they
against the taliban. they describe him as a long-time trusted guard for president karzai and his half brother. his half brother was shot and killed in the southern city of kandahar. the taliban claimed the shooter was asleeper agent. >>> 45 minutes past the hour. thousands of protesters continue their week-long sit-ins across the tahrir square. protesters are there now with the goal of seating a civilian presidential council to rule egypt during the transitional period. >>> and then a massive volcanic erupti eruption. the first eruption was last night followed by a second one this morning. the disaster management teams have been dispatched to the area to assess the damage. >>> an event more in the decade in the making. harry potter fans packed into theaters on thursday to behold the final battle between the hero and the dark lord. ha this latest film caps the end of what has captured a generation of more than 12 years. >>> and how about never-before-seen footage? now your interested. join larry king for a cnn special "harry potter, the final chapter," airs right here on cnn. >>> he's
the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's northwest in tribal areas. he also admits there was some skepticism about what help they are getting from pakistan after they killed osama bin laden last month. he did say that in the past pakistan has helped them track down some of the al-qaeda leadership. >> heather: thank you very much, david piper streaming live from afghanistan. >> gregg: are we really in reach of defeating al-qaeda? is the road to victory as simply as taking out the top 20 leaders. joining me now is senior advisor and principal of international advis
not the end of the taliban. you're looking at core group of individuals founded al qaeda and running it over the years. that may be on the brink of collapse but let's not say this movement is near its end. jon: so a little bit like turning the lights and cockroaches scatter? you may kill them off in places like afghanistan but they are over in the other places, somalia and arabian peninsula? >> that's right. actually this is a testament to bin laden's plan for the al qaeda network. he created a more diffuse network after the united states began to crack down on al qaeda in late 1990s. you saw rise of al qaeda in north africa and al shaback in east africa. al qaeda in iraq done great damage to u.s. forces. the taliban was once a government but relegated to affiliate movement of al qaeda. what you have a is number of organizations sort of franchises of al qaeda that continue to grow and thrive while we have focused in on the core as we called it. now i think after the death of bin laden in early may, i think we were able to get a lot of intelligence. we've gone after a lot of the other high-le
at least in turn did their best to repay the complement wherever they were established. the taliban, for instance, on overrunning -- [inaudible] but then their president for which one needs not travel as far back in antiquity as the roman catholic index. apartheid south africa, for instance w a list of banned books or malawi's censorship list, etc., etc., all currents of communism's internal and mutually-destructive literary controls. consider the amount of anti-literary energy that was expended over works, over which works of literature were ideologically correct or incorrect. the latter grouped as reactionary, undialectic products of -- [inaudible] etc., etc. variations of these contests survive until today in many parts of the third world, extreme disciples which still roam the jungles, the mountains or urban settlements of nigeria armed with definitive texts and other productive texttology that explicate the history and destiny of mankind from birth to death and excommunicate all others. one such surfaced in nigeria calls it -- [inaudible] translated as "death to all books. "um,
the taliban to peace talks when the u.s. forces drawdown. it's key to keep the pressure up to give the country a chance of some kind of reconciliation. and speaking in kandahar, he said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces but he acknowledged there remain, quote, a lot more work to do in materials of being able to transition the responsibility to them. afghan forces now number around 300,000 but very few of their units can act independently. back to you, gregg. >> gregg: david piper, thank you. >> heather: space shuttle atlantis linking up with the international space station important the last time. the final dock go to the orbital out post by a shuttle. it will retire after the flight. the last of the 30-year shuttle program. on its final journey, they arrived bearing gifts, four tons of supplies including clothing and food. >> america's brush with royalty coming to a close, duke and duchess wrapping up a tour in southern california. one of their final stops skid row arts school for kids of all ages. casey stegall is live in los angeles with more. explain the pu
democracy. with the american acquiescence and saudi financeing, the pakistani government created the taliban as islamabad's van guard for the conquest of afghanistan. in the process they set in place a fundamentalist antiwestern radical terrorist state. let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been slaughtered, the i.s.i. continued to covertly support radical islamic terrorists and they are still engaged in such hostile acts, even as american lives are being lost even today. in 2010 the london school of economics published a report that found agents of the i.s.i., this is 2010, long after 9/11, were, quote, funding and training the afghan taliban, end of quote. and the top things are -- to top this off, there is substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that pakistani diplomats are lobbying the afghanistan government -- afghan government leaders suggesting that they dump the united states and turn to china for a partnership and re-- in reconstruction. this isn't shame on them, this is shame on us. washington may be able to coerce and bribe islamabad into
15 others. the taliban claims responsibility but remains quiet on this mosque attack. karzai was a high-ranking official in kandahar's government, also considered one of the most powerful men in southern afghanistan. health let's well, a 6-year-old girl from illinois tees her way right into the record book by sinking a hole in one. reagan kennedy becoming the youngest golfer ever to hit a hole in one since the links at ireland grove opened some five years ago. and reagan kennedy, she joins us now by phone with her dad, steve kennedy also on the line. hi, steve, hi, reagan. >> hi, heather, how are you? heather: doing fine. how are you doing? >> we're doing well. heather: so, reagan, how surprised were you that you hit this hole in one? >> very surprised. heather: could you see the ball actually go in? i know it was, what, 85 yards. could you see it go in? >> no. heather: and what did you do right after you hit the hole in one? >> walked back to the cart. heather: so you walked back to the cart, and from what i understand your 13-year-old sister was sitting there, but you were
, please? thank you. guest: recently, one fellow, who is an american, who joined the taliban and is a prominent publicist in some of the al qaeda videos recently told americans to take up a jihad against the united states by going to gun shows and purchasing weapons there. he made the point that many critics of gun control policy have made that guns are easily available there. i think his wording is, "it is well known, so go out there and arm up." mayor michael bloomberg is against guns. he is a member of one of the groups that was spearheading that movement. host: next up from alabama on the independent line. you are on "washington journal." caller: good morning. i would like to comment about guns on college campuses. there was a time in this country when you had high school students with guns in their lockers so they could go to rotc after school. it was not uncommon that a little boy did not have a knife in his show. i am not suggesting a correlation between the two, but crime is higher now than it was then. i am not certain it is all a matter of gun control, but rather as
failures. i think the search was a success. i think a failure was announcing to the taliban the dates you are going to withdraw because while they may not have watches they do have calendars and it makes it very difficult to negotiate with someone or to drive into the bargaining table or drive them away if they know they only have to hide out for certain period of time and they can come back in because you were gone. i think that was a mistake on his part. i think it was a mistake not to oversee the elections in such a way the government elections, to make sure they were held in a way that had public confidence in a government that was not corrupt and was focused on getting the country back on its feet. >> i think there are some lessons learned. one is that we have been there 10 years and it is time for the afghan people to be able to take responsibility for preserving the independence which has been fought for so valiantly by our soldiers. our men and women have made extraordinary sacrifices they are and frankly and other places in the history of this great nation. we do want to see the
-- dismantle and defeat, reducing the -- stopping the momentum of the taliban and training of afghan security forces, we can begin to draw down our surge forces. 10,000 this year and 30,000 next year. >> has treasury secretary geithner told the president that he would like to leave -- >> not that i'm aware of no. >> i think he will be here for the foreseeable future. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> in a few brief comments before the white house briefing, the president invited leaders to the white house on thursday to continue to talk about the debt and deficit. we will give you a chance to see the president's comments again at 8:00 eastern and that will be here on c-span. the senate is in session today. earlier, they came in earlier to take up legislation on libya, but they have pulled that legislation from the floor. senate leaders pulling that resolution from the floor, according to "c.q." and harry reid is saying the most important thing to focus on is the budget and looking to discuss a resolution, s. 1323
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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